Publication details

 

The Rise of Medieval Towns and States in East Central Europe : Early Medieval Centres as Social and Economic Systems

Basic information
Original title:The Rise of Medieval Towns and States in East Central Europe : Early Medieval Centres as Social and Economic Systems
Author:Jiří Macháček
Further information
Citation:MACHÁČEK, Jiří. The Rise of Medieval Towns and States in East Central Europe : Early Medieval Centres as Social and Economic Systems. Leiden - Boston: Koninklijke Brill NV, 2010. 562 s. East Central and Eastern Europe in the Middle Ages. ISBN 978-90-04-18208-0.Export BibTeX
@book{874206,
author = {Macháček, Jiří},
address = {Leiden - Boston},
keywords = {Early Middle Ages; archaeology; Central Europe; Pohansko; centres; systems theory; PCA},
language = {eng},
location = {Leiden - Boston},
isbn = {978-90-04-18208-0},
publisher = {Koninklijke Brill NV},
title = {The Rise of Medieval Towns and States in East Central Europe : Early Medieval Centres as Social and Economic Systems},
url = {http://www.brill.nl/default.aspx?partid=210&pid=31107},
year = {2010}
}
Original language:English
Field:Archaeology, anthropology, ethnology
WWW:link to a new windowhttp://www.brill.nl/default.aspx?partid=210&pid=31107
Type:Monograph
Keywords:Early Middle Ages; archaeology; Central Europe; Pohansko; centres; systems theory; PCA

This book is a contribution to efforts to understand the transformation that took place across the European continent, and in particular East Central Europe, during the second half of the first millennium. Its goal is to draw conclusions primarily on the basis of the archaeological evidence from important early medieval centres. A special emphasis is given to Pohansko near Břeclav (Czech Republic), perhaps the best studied centre of its kind in the entire region. In terms of methodology the book marks a new attempt to interlink a number of proven methodological tools used in western archaeology from the 1970s, to new questions related to a cognitive approach to archaeology and the positivist tradition of Central European archaeology.

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