Publication details

Complex Motor-Cognitive Factors Processed in the Anterior Nucleus of the Thalamus: An Intracerebral Recording Study

Authors

BOČKOVÁ Martina CHLÁDEK Jan JURÁK Pavel HALÁMEK Josef ŠTILLOVÁ Klára BALÁŽ Marek CHRASTINA Jan REKTOR Ivan

Year of publication 2015
Type Article in Periodical
Magazine / Source BRAIN TOPOGRAPHY
MU Faculty or unit

Central European Institute of Technology

Citation
Web http://download-v2.springer.com/static/pdf/904/art%253A10.1007%252Fs10548-014-0373-7.pdf?token2=exp=1429272126~acl=%2Fstatic%2Fpdf%2F904%2Fart%25253A10.1007%25252Fs10548-014-0373-7.pdf*~hmac=3a33c251872fce59a661d07f2d639da3d6180cd8ef2eb393e6a6b3a8d06befd
Doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10548-014-0373-7
Field Neurology, neurosurgery, neurosciences
Keywords Anterior nucleus of the thalamus; Complex cognitive functions; Deep brain stimulation; ERD/S; ERP
Attached files
Description Cognitive adverse effects were reported after the deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the anterior nucleus of the thalamus (AN) in epilepsy. As the AN may have an influence on widespread neocortical networks, we hypothesized that the AN, in addition to its participation in memory processing, may also participate in cognitive activities linked with the frontal neocortical structures. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the AN might participate in complex motor–cognitive activities. Three pharmacoresistant epilepsy patients implanted with AN–DBS electrodes performed two tasks involving the writing of single letters: (1) copying letters from a monitor; and (2) writing of any letter other than that appearing on the monitor. The cognitive load of the second task was increased. The task-related oscillatory changes and evoked potentials were assessed. Local event-related alpha and beta desynchronization were more expressed during the second task while the lower gamma synchronization decreased. The local field event-related potentials were elicited by the two tasks without any specific differences. The AN participates in cognitive networks processing complex motor–cognitive tasks. Attention should be paid to executive functions in subjects undergoing AN–DBS.
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