Publication details

Death age, seasonality, taphonomy and colonization of seal carcasses from Ulu Peninsula, James Ross Island, Antarctic Peninsula

Authors

NÝVLT Daniel NÝVLTOVÁ FIŠÁKOVÁ Miriam BARTÁK Miloš STACHOŇ Zdeněk PAVEL Václav MLČOCH Bedřich LÁSKA Kamil

Year of publication 2016
Type Article in Periodical
Magazine / Source Antarctic Science
MU Faculty or unit

Faculty of Science

Citation
Doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S095410201500036X
Field Ecology
Keywords James Ross Island; preservation state; Prince Gustav Channel; sea ice; seal behaviour
Attached files
Description The origin and nature of seal carcasses scattered around the Ulu Peninsula, James Ross Island, is examined using robust and novel multidisciplinary analysis. Spatial distribution analysis indicates their predominance at low elevations and on surfaces with negligible slope. The seals died throughout the last century. Dental cement increments indicate that the seals died in late winter, and we interpret this to show an influence of the persistence and break-up of sea ice and the appearance of pools/cracks in the northern Prince Gustav Channel on death. Specifically, after being trapped by a late winter freeze-up the seals search for open water, become disoriented by snow-covered flat valleys and move inland. Carcasses from all age groups of crabeater seal are found on land, but inland movement is less notable for Weddell and leopard seals. Although most carcasses appear to have remained unchanged during the last 10 years due to the cold and dry conditions, a few carcasses that are located in sites of snow accumulation and subsequent melting have undergone enhanced decay. Decaying seal carcasses represent loci of nutrient release in a nutrient deficient environment and are colonized by algae, cyanobacteria, lichens and mosses. This research suggests further useful studies for the future.
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