Publication details

Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the atmosphere of coastal areas of the Ross Sea, Antarctica: Indications for long-term downward trends

Authors

POZO Karla Andrea MARTELLINI Tania CORSOLINI Simonetta HARNER Tom ESTELLANO Victor KUKUČKA Petr MULDER Marie Daniëlle LAMMEL Gerhard CINCINELLI Alessandra

Year of publication 2017
Type Article in Periodical
Magazine / Source Chemosphere
MU Faculty or unit

Faculty of Science

Citation
Web https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0045653517303077?via%3Dihub
Doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.02.118
Keywords PCBs; OCPs; Antarctica; Air; Backward trajectories; Passive air samplers; Ross sea
Description Passive air samplers were used to evaluate long-term trends and spatial distribution of trace organic compounds in Antarctica. Duplicate PUF disk samplers were deployed at six automatic weather stations in the coastal area of the Ross sea (East Antarctica), between December 2010 and January 2011, during the XXVI Italian Scientific Research Expedition. Among the investigated persistent organic compounds, Hexachlorobenzene was the most abundant, with air concentrations ranging from 0.8 to 50 pg m(-3). In general, the following decreasing concentration order was found for the air samples analyzed: HCB > PeCB > PCBs > DDTs > HCHs. While HCB concentrations were in the same range as those reported in the atmosphere of other Antarctic sampling areas and did not show a decline, HCHs and DDTs levels were lower or similar to those determined one or two decades ago. In general, the very low concentrations reflected the pristine state of the East Antarctica air. Backward trajectories indicated the prevalence of air masses coming from the Antarctic continent. Local contamination and volatilization from ice were suggested as potential sources for the presence of persistent organic pollutants in the atmosphere.
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