Publication details

Prognostic factors and seizure outcome in posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) in children with hematological malignancies and bone marrow failure: A retrospective monocentric study

Authors

DANHOFER Pavlína HABALOVÁ Michaela ČERNÁ Dáša ZAPLETALOVÁ Danica HORÁK Ondřej AULICKÁ Štefánia JUŘÍKOVÁ Lenka DOMANSKÝ Jiří KOVALČÍKOVÁ Petra PAVLÍK Tomáš ŠTĚRBA Jaroslav OŠLEJŠKOVÁ Hana

Year of publication 2019
Type Article in Periodical
Magazine / Source Seizure-European journal of epilepsy
MU Faculty or unit

Faculty of Medicine

Citation
Web http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.seizure.2019.08.007
Doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.seizure.2019.08.007
Keywords PRES; Children; Oncology; Seizure; MRI; Prognosis
Description Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate seizure outcome in children with hematological malignancies and PRES and to identify prognostic factors that could help manage the syndrome. Method: We retrospectively reviewed the report data of 21 patients diagnosed with hematological malignancy or aplastic anemia and PRES between 2008 and 2018. Basic demographic data, oncology treatment, presympto-matic hypertension before PRES manifestation, neurological status, seizure type, and EEG and MRI findings at PRES onset and at the one-year follow-up visit were studied. Patients who developed remote symptomatic seizures or epilepsy were identified. Results: We included 21 children (11 females and 10 males) in the study. Sixteen patients (76.2%) were diagnosed with ALL and the rest individually with AML, CML, T-lymphoma, Burkitt lymphoma, and severe aplastic anemia. Presymptomatic hypertension (PSH) was evaluated in 19 patients and was present in 18 (94.7%). The duration was 9 h and more in 16 patients (88.8%); the severity was grade II in 12 patients (66.7%). Seizures as the initial symptom of PRES were present in 17 patients (80.9%). Four patients (19.0%) were assessed with remote symptomatic seizures. Two of them (9.5%) had ongoing seizures at the one-year follow-up visit and were diagnosed with epilepsy. The presence of gliosis on follow-up MRI indicated worse outcome with development of epilepsy (without statistical significance). Conclusions: PRES syndrome has an overall good prognosis and the evolution to epilepsy is rare. The severity and duration of PSH or seizure severity and EEG findings at PRES onsetwere not associated with worse neurological outcomes in this study.
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