Publication details

Cell-based data to predict the toxicity of chemicals to fish. Commentary on the manuscript by Rodrigues et al., 2019. Cell-based assays seem not to accurately predict fish short-term toxicity of pesticides. Environmental Pollution 252:476-482

Authors

SCHIRMER K. STADNICKA-MICHALAK J. BELANGER S.E. BLÁHA Luděk BOLS N.C. DYER S.D. EMBRY M.R. FISCHER M. HAIDER M. HERMENS J. HULTMAN M.T. KRAMER N. LAUE H. LEE L.E.J. LILLICRAP A. NATSCH A. SEGNER H. TANNEBERGER K. TOLLEFSEN K.E. WERNER I. WITTERS H. ZUPANIC A.

Year of publication 2019
Type Article in Periodical
Magazine / Source Environmental Pollution
MU Faculty or unit

Faculty of Science

Citation
Web https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0269749119337893?via%3Dihub
Doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2019.113060
Keywords Metabolic activation
Description We would like to express strong concerns about the publication by Rodrigues et al., entitled: “Cell-based assays seem not to accurately predict fish short-term toxicity of pesticides”, which was recently published in “Environmental Pollution” (2019, 252, pages 476–482, accepted May 07/2019, available online May 27/2019). The topic of the paper is of great interest to the toxicology community because it addresses the need to define alternatives to animals in chemical risk assessment. The authors collected a large amount of in vitro data on chemical testing and added some of their own – the entire data set being predominantly focused on mammalian cell systems - and then attempted a comparison with data for the same chemicals regarding their toxicity to fish. Unfortunately, the work presented is flawed in several ways, sending an undifferentiated, if not wrong, message. Because we fear that this publication can cause unjustified damage to the achievements already made and to the ongoing efforts of the growing community in academia, industry and regulation to further alternatives to animal testing, we wish to openly discuss our concerns.