Publication details

What Social Network Analysis Can Teach us about the Transmission of Dissidence among Kent Lollards

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Authors

ZBÍRAL David ESTÉVEZ NAVARRO José Luis HAMPEJS Tomáš KRÁL Jan

Year of publication 2022
Type Appeared in Conference without Proceedings
MU Faculty or unit

Faculty of Arts

Citation
Description By contrast to some more ostensibly ritualistic religious cultures (e.g., Cathars and even Waldensians), dissidents framed as Lollards are in many ways defined by illicit speech – the communication of the religious message outside the boundaries of orthodoxy as demarcated by bishops investigating heresy in England. Scholarship conveys the image of Lollardy as centred upon religious reading, granting greater religious agency to women, and transmitted through kinship and neighbourhood links. In the Dissident Networks Project (DISSINET, https://dissinet.cz), we have focused on the case of Kent Lollards investigated in 1511–12 by William Warham, archbishop of Canterbury, and test these and similar propositions about Lollardy using formal methods of social network analysis including statistical models for social networks. This paper presents our results concerning the role of gender, family ties, and co-location in the study of the illicit speech network of Kent Lollards as portrayed in the extant trial records.
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