Informace o publikaci

Comparison of two human organoid models of lung and intestinal inflammation reveals Toll-like receptor signalling activation and monocyte recruitment

Autoři

SUSHAMA JOSE Shyam DE ZUANI Marco TIDU Federico HORTOVÁ KOHOUTKOVÁ Marcela PAZZAGLI Lucia FORTE Giancarlo SPACCAPELO Roberta ZELANTE Teresa FRIČ Jan

Rok publikování 2020
Druh Článek v odborném periodiku
Časopis / Zdroj CLINICAL & TRANSLATIONAL IMMUNOLOGY
Fakulta / Pracoviště MU

Lékařská fakulta

Citace
www https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdfdirect/10.1002/cti2.1131
Doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cti2.1131
Klíčová slova immune response; infection; leucocyte migration; tissue organoids; Toll-like receptors
Popis Objectives The activation of immune responses in mucosal tissues is a key factor for the development and sustainment of several pathologies including infectious diseases and autoimmune diseases. However, translational research and personalised medicine struggle to advance because of the lack of suitable preclinical models that successfully mimic the complexity of human tissues without relying on in vivo mouse models. Here, we propose two in vitro human 3D tissue models, deprived of any resident leucocytes, to model mucosal tissue inflammatory processes. Methods We developed human 3D lung and intestinal organoids differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells to model mucosal tissues. We then compared their response to a panel of microbial ligands and investigated their ability to attract and host human primary monocytes. Results Mature lung and intestinal organoids comprised epithelial (EpCAM(+)) and mesenchymal (CD73(+)) cells which responded to Toll-like receptor stimulation by releasing pro-inflammatory cytokines and expressing tissue inflammatory markers including MMP9, COX2 and CRP. When added to the organoid culture, primary human monocytes migrated towards the organoids and began to differentiate to an 'intermediate-like' phenotype characterised by increased levels of CD14 and CD16. Conclusion We show that human mucosal organoids exhibit proper immune functions and successfully mimic an immunocompetent tissue microenvironment able to host patient-derived immune cells. Our experimental set-up provides a novel tool to tackle the complexity of immune responses in mucosal tissues which can be tailored to different human pathologies.