Publication details

Holocaust history is not reflected in telomere homeostasis in survivors and their offspring

Authors

KONEČNÁ Klára LYČKA Martin NOHELOVÁ Lucie PETRÁKOVÁ Monika FŇAŠKOVÁ Monika KORIŤÁKOVÁ Eva SOVÁKOVÁ Pavla BRABENCOVÁ Sylva PREISS Marek REKTOR Ivan FAJKUS Jiří FOJTOVÁ Miloslava

Type Article in Periodical
Magazine / Source Journal of Psychiatric Research
MU Faculty or unit

Central European Institute of Technology

Citation
Web Stránka publikace na PubMed
Doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2019.06.018
Keywords Telomere; Holocaust; stress; quantitative PCR
Description Telomeres, nucleoprotein structures at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes, are crucial for the maintenance of genome integrity. While the lengths of telomeres at birth are determined genetically, many factors including environmental and living conditions affect the telomere lengths during a lifespan. In this context, extreme and long-term stress has been shown to negatively impact telomeres and their protective function, with even offspring being influenced by the stress experienced by parents. Using quantitative PCR, the relative lengths of telomeres of survivors of the Holocaust during World War II and two generations of their offspring were analyzed. These data were related to those of control groups, persons of comparable age without a strong life stress experience. In contrast to previous studies of other stress-exposed groups, the relative lengths of telomeres were comparable in groups of persons exposed to Holocaust-related stress and their progenies, and in control groups. Interestingly, shorter telomeres of Holocaust survivors of the age under 12 in the year 1945 compared to Holocaust survivors of the age above 12 were detected. Our results are discussed with respect to certain exceptionality of persons having been able to cope with an extreme stress more than 70 years ago and living to a very old age.
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