Publication details

Význam fibroblastů asociovaných s nádorem při patogenezi karcinomů v oblasti hlavy a krku

Title in English The importance of cancer-associated fibroblasts in the pathogenesis of head and neck cancers
Authors

RAUDENSKÁ Martina SVOBODOVÁ Markéta GUMULEC Jaromír FALK M. MASAŘÍK Michal

Year of publication 2020
Type Article in Periodical
Magazine / Source Klinická onkologie
MU Faculty or unit

Faculty of Medicine

Citation
Web https://www.linkos.cz/files/klinicka-onkologie/467/5685.pdf
Doi http://dx.doi.org/10.14735/amko202039
Keywords Angiogenesis; Cancer microenvironment; Cancer-associated fibroblasts; Extracellular matrix; Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma; Neoplasm metastasis
Description Background: Despite progress in anticancer therapies, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has still a low survival rate. Recent studies have shown that tumour stroma may play an important role in the pathogenesis of this malignant disease. Fibroblasts are a major component of the tumour microenvironment and may significantly influence HNSCC progression as indicated by the contribution they make to important hallmarks of cancer, such as inflammation, non-restricted growth, angiogenesis, invasion, metastasis, and therapy resistance. It is well known that tumour cells can confer a cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF) phenotype that supports the growth and dissemination of cancer cells. CAFs can stimulate cancer progression through cell-cell contacts and communication, remodelling of extracellular matrix, and production of many signal molecules and matrix metalloproteinases. Consequently, genetic changes in epithelial cells are probably not the only factor that drives HNSCC carcinogenesis. Non-genetic changes in the tumour stroma can also be significantly involved. Stress-induced signals can induce a multicellular program, creating a field of tissue that is predisposed to malignant transformation. The “field cancerization” concept represents a process of active evolution of intercellular interactions and feedback loops between tumour and stromal cells. This model paves the way to study cancer from a new perspective and identify new therapeutic targets. Purpose: In this review, we discuss current knowledge about CAFs, such as their cellular origin, phenotypical plasticity and functional heterogeneity, and stress their contribution to HNSCC progression. © 2020, Czech Medical Association J.E. Purkyne. All rights reserved.
Related projects: