Publication details

Adaptace škály managementu chování a výuky na české podmínky

Title in English Adaptation of the Behavior and Instructional Management Scale to Czech classroom conditions
Authors

VLČKOVÁ Kateřina KVĚTON Petr JEŽEK Stanislav MAREŠ Jan LOJDOVÁ Kateřina

Year of publication 2019
Type Article in Periodical
Magazine / Source Studia paedagogica
MU Faculty or unit

Faculty of Education

Citation
Web full text SP
Doi http://dx.doi.org/10.5817/SP2019-1-6
Keywords classroom management; behavioural management; instructional management; Behavior and Instructional Management Scale; teachers; lower secondary education; questionnaire adaptation
Attached files
Description Classroom management can be viewed as a system of strategies employed by a teacher to influence the social space of the classroom to foster an environment where learning can occur. Teachers' effective classroom management leads to high student achievement and contributes to teachers remaining in the profession. Two basic dimensions of classroom management can be distinguished: (a) behaviour management, which is directed at both preventing misbehaviour by setting rules and so on and reacting to misbehaviour; and (b) instructional management, which is aimed at well-planned lessons and includes aspects of classroom life such as establishing teaching goals, using instructional methods, and monitoring independent student work. These two dimensions of classroom management can be measured by 12 items on the Behavior and Instructional Management Scale (BIMS; Martin & Sass, 2010), the adaptation to Czech conditions of which we describe in this study. The longer 24-item Czech version of the BIMS (published by the BIMS authors as the basis for questionnaire development) was administered to 123 teachers in lower secondary schools in the city of Brno and its surroundings. Confirmatory factor analysis was conducted for the 12-item scale selected from the final version of the original English BIMS version. The two-factor model of behaviour and instructional management fitted to the data in approximately a similar degree as was the case for the authors of the original method. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted for the longer item set. The modified set of 12 items was suggested as a more suitable version for Czech conditions. For both instrument versions, the internal consistency was found to be of an acceptable level. The original version of the BIMS can be recommended for research purposes if the aim is an international comparison. The modified version suggested by us requires further validation in follow-up studies, as we discuss in this study along with further possible research applications.
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