Publication details

Global evidence of extreme intuitive moral prejudice against atheists.

Authors

GERVAIS Will M. XYGALATAS Dimitris MCKAY Ryan T. VAN ELK Michiel BUCHTEL Emma E. AVEYARD Mark SCHIAVONE Sarah DAR-NIMROD Ilan SVEDHOLM-HÄKKINEN Annika M. RIEKKI Tapani KUNDTOVÁ KLOCOVÁ Eva RAMSAY Jonathan E. BULBULIA Joseph

Type Article in Periodical
Magazine / Source Nature Human Behaviour
MU Faculty or unit

Faculty of Arts

Citation
WWW https://doi.org/10.1038/s41562-017-0151
Doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41562-017-0151
Field Philosophy and religion
Keywords Evolution; Human behaviour; Psychology; Atheism; Prejudice; Representativeness heuristic
Description Mounting evidence supports longstanding claims that religions can extend cooperative networks. However, religious prosociality may have a strongly parochial component. Moreover, aspects of religion may promote or exacerbate conflict with those outside a given religious group, promoting regional violence, intergroup conflict and tacit prejudice against non-believers. Anti-atheist prejudice a growing concern in increasingly secular societies affects employment, elections, family life and broader social inclusion. Preliminary work in the United States suggests that anti-atheist prejudice stems, in part, from deeply rooted intu- itions about religion’s putatively necessary role in morality. However, the cross-cultural prevalence and magnitude — as well as intracultural demographic stability — of such intuitions, as manifested in intuitive associations of immorality with atheists, remain unclear.
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