Publication details

The Effect of Butyrate-Supplemented Parenteral Nutrition on Intestinal Defence Mechanisms and the Parenteral Nutrition-Induced Shift in the Gut Microbiota in the Rat Model

Authors

JIRSOVA Zuzana HECZKOVA Marie DANKOVA Helena MALINSKA Hana VÍDEŇSKÁ Petra VESPALCOVÁ Hana MICENKOVÁ Lenka BARTONOVA Lenka STICOVA Eva LODEREROVA Alena PREFERTUSOVA Lucia SEKERKOVA Alena HRADECKY Jaromir CAHOVA Monika

Year of publication 2019
Type Article in Periodical
Magazine / Source Biomed Research International
MU Faculty or unit

Faculty of Science

Citation
Web Full Text
Doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2019/7084734
Keywords REGULATORY T-CELLS; DENDRITIC CELLS; IMMUNE; HOST; METABOLITES; EXPRESSION; DIFFERENTIATION; INFLAMMATION; MATURATION; MOLECULE
Description Butyrate produced by the intestinal microbiota is essential for proper functioning of the intestinal immune system. Total dependence on parenteral nutrition (PN) is associated with numerous adverse effects, including severe microbial dysbiosis and loss of important butyrate producers. We hypothesised that a lack of butyrate produced by the gut microbiota may be compensated by its supplementation in PN mixtures. We tested whether i.v. butyrate administration would (a) positively modulate intestinal defence mechanisms and (b) counteract PN-induced dysbiosis. Male Wistar rats were randomised to chow, PN, and PN supplemented with 9 mM butyrate (PN+But) for 12 days. Antimicrobial peptides, mucins, tight junction proteins, and cytokine expression were assessed by RT-qPCR. T-cell subpopulations in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) were analysed by flow cytometry. Microbiota composition was assessed in caecum content. Butyrate supplementation resulted in increased expression of tight junction proteins (ZO-1, claudin-7, E-cadherin), antimicrobial peptides (Defa 8, Rd5, RegIII), and lysozyme in the ileal mucosa. Butyrate partially alleviated PN-induced intestinal barrier impairment and normalised IL-4, IL-10, and IgA mRNA expression. PN administration was associated with an increase in Tregs in MLN, which was normalised by butyrate. Butyrate increased the total number of CD4+ and decreased a relative amount of CD8+ memory T cells in MLN. Lack of enteral nutrition and PN administration led to a shift in caecal microbiota composition. Butyrate did not reverse the altered expression of most taxa but did influence the abundance of some potentially beneficial/pathogenic genera, which might contribute to its overall beneficial effect.