Publication details

OXIDATION SIGNALS OF INSULIN ON SCREEN-PRINTED ELECTRODES

Authors

TŘÍSKOVÁ Iveta JANC Tadeja TRNKOVÁ Libuše

Year of publication 2020
Type Article in Proceedings
Conference XX. Workshop of Biophysical Chemists and Electrochemists
MU Faculty or unit

Faculty of Science

Citation
Keywords insulin; modified screen-printed electrodes; voltammetry
Description Direct and efficient electro-oxidation of insulin is important for the development of fast and sensitive electrochemical detectors for this hormone [1,2]. However, the study of the oxidation processes of insulin on conventional graphite electrodes is limited by the very slow electron transfer kinetics. To overcome this shortcoming, it is possible to modify the electrode surface with a suitable catalyst, which reduces the value of the polarization overvoltage and the oxidation signals are measurable in the potential window area of the treated electrode. There are a number of modifying agents, ranging from various nanoparticles and nanocomposites to metal and polymer layers [3-6]. To realize our idea to catalyze the direct oxidation process of insulin (Figure 1), we chose two types of surface modifications of the graphite electrode, namely the modified screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs) with bismuth oxide [7,8] or carbon nanofibers [9]. Using both types of SPCEs, the linear sweep voltammetric (LSV) signals of recombinant human insulin were recorded. This research is the starting point for the development of a nanostructured non-enzymatic insulin sensor with the highest possible sensitivity, which will be ensured not only by the optimal experimental conditions but also by suitable electroanalytical methods. In order to understand the catalytic effect of nanoparticles modifying the surface of an electrochemical sensor, our further research will focus on the study of the morphology of electrode surfaces in relation to the kinetics of electron transfer in the oxidation process of insulin.
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