Publication details

ACE Insertion/Deletion Polymorphism Associated with Caries in Permanent but Not Primary Dentition in Czech Children

Authors

BOŘILOVÁ LINHARTOVÁ Petra KAŠTOVSKÝ Jakub BARTOŠOVÁ Michaela MUSILOVÁ Kristína ŽÁČKOVÁ Lenka KUKLETOVÁ Martina KUKLA Lubomír IZAKOVIČOVÁ HOLLÁ Lydie

Year of publication 2016
Type Article in Periodical
Magazine / Source Caries Research
MU Faculty or unit

Faculty of Medicine

Citation
Doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000443534
Field ORL, ophthalmology, stomatology
Keywords gene polymorphism; ACE; dental caries; children; ELSPAC
Description Objective: Dental caries is a multifactorial, infectious disease where genetic predisposition plays an important role. Insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) has very recently been associated with caries in Polish children. The aim of this study was to analyze ACE I/D polymorphism in a group of caries-free children versus subjects affected by dental caries in the Czech population. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study, 182 caries-free children (with decayed/missing/filled teeth, DMFT = 0), 561 subjects with dental caries (DMFT 1) aged 13–15 years and 220 children aged 2–6 years with early childhood caries (ECC, dmft 1) were included. Genotype determination of ACE I/D polymorphism in intron 16 was based on the TaqMan method. Results: Although no significant differences in the allele or genotype frequencies between the cariesfree children and those affected by dental caries were observed, statistically significant differences between the children with DMFT = 0 and the subgroup of 179 patients with high caries experience (DMFT 4; p < 0.01 and p < 0.05, respectively) were detected. The comparison of DD versus II+ID genotype frequencies between the patients with DMFT 1 or DMFT 4 and healthy children also showed significant differences (31.5% or 35.6% vs. 23.6%, p < 0.05 or p < 0.01, respectively). A gender-based analysis identified a significant difference in the DD versus II+ID genotype frequencies only in girls (p < 0.05). In contrast, no significant association of ACE I/D polymorphism with ECC in young children was found (p > 0.05). Conclusions: ACE I/D polymorphism may be associated with caries in permanent but not primary dentition, especially in girls in the Czech population.
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