Informace o publikaci

Native Gammarus fossarum affects species composition of macroinvertebrate communities: evidence from laboratory, field enclosures, and natural habitat

Autoři

SYROVÁTKA Vít ZHAI Marie BOJKOVÁ Jindřiška ŠORFOVÁ Vanda HORSÁK Michal

Rok publikování 2020
Druh Článek v odborném periodiku
Časopis / Zdroj AQUATIC ECOLOGY
Fakulta / Pracoviště MU

Přírodovědecká fakulta

Citace
www Full text
Doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10452-020-09756-y
Klíčová slova DIKEROGAMMARUS-VILLOSUS; LARVAL POPULATION; KILLER SHRIMP; CRUSTACEA; AMPHIPODA; PREDATION; BEHAVIOR; IMPACTS; FENS; TEMPERATURE
Popis Despite the fact that native species of amphipods have been recognized as active predators similarly to invasive species, little is known about their predatory impact on aquatic communities. In this study, we used a laboratory experiment, a field enclosure experiment, and an analysis of natural community data to demonstrate how Gammarus fossarum affects the species composition of benthic communities by imposing survival selection on its prey. Our laboratory single-prey experiment brought a clear evidence that tube-less chironomids are vulnerable prey and that the predation rate on the tube-dwelling chironomids decreases with increasing tube toughness (from the soft tubes made of detritus to the hard tubes made of sand or calcium carbonate grains). We found that the introduction of G. fossarum to field enclosures significantly changed the species composition of a macroinvertebrate community at an experimental spring fen site. The soft-bodied, slow moving, and tube-less taxa were depleted the most. It appears that the observed patterns were a result of predator's preference rather than encounter rate. Survival selection was detected also in natural communities across a large spatial scale. In accordance with the experiments, high densities of G. fossarum limited the proportion or abundance of vulnerable prey. Our study (1) provides the first convincing evidence that biotic interactions have a structuring effect on the spring fen communities, (2) documents how the predatory effect in a community depends on an interplay between the prey handling behaviour of the predator and species-specific susceptibility of prey, and (3) shows that an omnivorous native amphipod may have a strong impact on aquatic communities despite it is regarded less aggressive than its invasive relatives.
Související projekty: