Informace o publikaci

Sensitivity-enhanced three-dimensional and carbon-detected two-dimensional NMR of proteins using hyperpolarized water

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OLSEN G.L. SZEKELY O. MATEOS B. KADEŘÁVEK Pavel FERRAGE F. KONRAT R. PIERATTELLI R. FELLI I.C. BODENHAUSEN G. KURZBACH D. FRYDMAN L.

Druh Článek v odborném periodiku
Časopis / Zdroj Journal of biomolecular NMR
Fakulta / Pracoviště MU

Středoevropský technologický institut

Citace
www https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10858-020-00301-5
Doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10858-020-00301-5
Klíčová slova Hyperpolarization; Dissolution-dynamic nuclear polarization (D-DNP); Direct C-13 detection; 3D NMR; Non-uniform sampling; BEST-HNCO
Popis Signal enhancements of up to two orders of magnitude in protein NMR can be achieved by employing HDO as a vector to introduce hyperpolarization into folded or intrinsically disordered proteins. In this approach, hyperpolarized HDO produced by dissolution-dynamic nuclear polarization (D-DNP) is mixed with a protein solution waiting in a high-field NMR spectrometer, whereupon amide proton exchange and nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE) transfer hyperpolarization to the protein and enable acquisition of a signal-enhanced high-resolution spectrum. To date, the use of this strategy has been limited to 1D and H-1-N-15 2D correlation experiments. Here we introduce 2D C-13-detected D-DNP, to reduce exchange-induced broadening and other relaxation penalties that can adversely affect proton-detected D-DNP experiments. We also introduce hyperpolarized 3D spectroscopy, opening the possibility of D-DNP studies of larger proteins and IDPs, where assignment and residue-specific investigation may be impeded by spectral crowding. The signal enhancements obtained depend in particular on the rates of chemical and magnetic exchange of the observed residues, thus resulting in non-uniform 'hyperpolarization-selective' signal enhancements. The resulting spectral sparsity, however, makes it possible to resolve and monitor individual amino acids in IDPs of over 200 residues at acquisition times of just over a minute. We apply the proposed experiments to two model systems: the compactly folded protein ubiquitin, and the intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) osteopontin (OPN).